Using PowerShell to determine the state of MAPI Encryption on Exchange Servers

In Exchange 2010 specifically, or even Exchange 2007/2010 mixed orgs you can easily detect which servers require MAPI encryption.

The easiest would be to run Get-RPCClientAccess, which returns all Exchange 2010 servers  hosting MAPI Endpoints and all encryption levels as well as if the server carries  MAPI client and/or public folder responsibility.

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The output above may be a bit confusing, since the client MAPI end point is the CAS server, however LON-MLT has CAS/HUB and mailbox roles installed on it. These are Exchange 2010 RTM servers only.

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Let’s contrast that with the Exchange 2007 servers in the org.

Red-MBX-2007 is the client MAPI endpoint (mailbox server), RED-MBX-1/2 and LON-MLT all host Public folders only and as far as Exchange 2007 is concerned.

The next question may be, how do you know what versions of Exchange are deployed on each server – Glad you asked, Get-ExchangeServer to the rescue

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Obviously you can specify specific Exchange servers on the command line to interrogate each server individually if you want to.

Nicolas Blank

Nicolas is an Architect, author, and speaker focused on all things Exchange and Cloud at NBConsult. With over 16 years of experience on Exchange, Nicolas consults to customers globally on cloud based and on-premises Exchange as well as ISVs building Exchange focused products. Nicolas has extensive experience using Azure to create public and private Azure based offerings leveraging cloud based principles and common sense. Nicolas currently holds status of MCM Exchange 2010, Office 365 (Microsoft Certified Master), MCSM Exchange 2013, and has been awarded Microsoft MVP (Most Valuable Professional) for Microsoft Exchange since March 2007. Nicolas has co-authored "Microsoft Exchange Server 2013: Design, Deploy and Deliver an Enterprise Messaging Solution," published by Sybex. Nicolas blogs regularly on Exchange and messaging topics at blankmanblog.com, tweets at @nicolasblank, and is the founder of and a contributor to IT Pro Africa itproafrica.com and @itproafrica

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